Hot Trend Alert - Microneedling

What is microneedling?

Microneedling (also known as collagen induction therapy) involves using fine needles to create hundreds of tiny, invisible puncture wounds in the top layer of skin. Sound appealing? Not so much. But this minimally invasive treatment—whether it's done in-office by a trained aesthetician, dermatologist, or plastic surgeon, or at home using a dermaroller (a small, handheld paint roller coated in tiny needles)—is virtually painless and incredibly effective. It works the same way lasers do, only you're injuring the skin mechanically instead of using heat or light. Believe it or not, microneedling has become hugely popular among skincare fanatics.

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Microneedling reduces fine and deep wrinkles

The primary appeal of microneedling is its ability to stimulate growth of collagen and elastin, which is the key to new, youthful-looking skin. Some doctors would even go so far as to say that the procedure is the most powerful way to stop aging in its tracks and prevent new fine lines and wrinkles from forming. With its ability to trigger the generation of new skin cells, just a few sessions of microneedling will noticeably reduce fine lines, crow's feet, and deep wrinkles on the forehead.

Microneedling repairs visible scars

Professional grade microneedling devices can be as long as 3 mm, which is twice as effective and will treat deep acne scars that occur beneath the surface of the skin. In case you're wondering how microneedling compares to fractional laser treatments when it comes to resolving acne scars, a head-to-head comparison published in the journal Dermatologic Surgery in 2016, found both treatments to be comparable and effective, but gave credit to microneedling for being better tolerated, with fewer side effects and less downtime.

Microneedling reverses sun damage and pigmentation

Once again, collagen is arguably the most vital way to improve the look of skin, and this goes far beyond reducing wrinkles. By stimulating collagen growth with microneedling, you can also reverse sun damage and discoloration, including the hyperpigmentation that comes with melasma. To improve extra pigmentation from sun-damaged skin, your dermaroller needles should range between 1.0 mm an 1.5 mm in length.

Just like with any procedure, do your research to find a licensed practitioner, and ask your fair share of questions.